Wednesday, March 10, 2010

Justice John Roberts on Obama Complaint from SOTU Presidential Podium

In an unprecedented move from the Presidential podium, Obama took the Supreme Court to task over a recent decision handed down involving campaign financing during his January State of the Union (SOTU) address. It was a disgraceful move on such an important night, in front of the Nation. The dam broke this week, when Chief Justice of the U.S. John Roberts answered a question from a student at University of Alabama Law School about the President's dress-down of his Court. Our pouty, thin-skinned, irritable White House felt compelled to put the Chief Justice in his place, which is obviously deemed below the Executive Branch - making astonishing news to our Founders, were they here to hear it. See videos below.

Justice John Roberts

Here is the answer from Roberts. You can hear the student's question in the first video below:
Responding to a University of Alabama law student’s question, Roberts said anyone was free to criticize the court, and some have an obligation to do so because of their positions.
“So I have no problems with that,” he said. “On the other hand, there is the issue of the setting, the circumstances and the decorum.
“The image of having the members of one branch of government standing up, literally surrounding the Supreme Court, cheering and hollering while the court — according the requirements of protocol — has to sit there expressionless, I think is very troubling.”
Our President knows no economy of words. The White House lashed right back today. Press Secretary Robert Gibbs said this:
"What is troubling is that this decision opened the floodgates for corporations and special interests to pour money into elections - drowning out the voices of average Americans," Gibbs said. "The President has long been committed to reducing the undue influence of special interests and their lobbyists over government. That is why he spoke out to condemn the decision and is working with Congress on a legislative response."
The following remarks from the President are what started these exchanges: (see the second video below and note the reaction of Justice Samuel Alito)
"Last week, the Supreme Court reversed a century of law to open the floodgates for special interests — including foreign corporations — to spend without limit in our elections," Obama said. "Well I don’t think American elections should be bankrolled by America’s most powerful interests, or worse, by foreign entities. They should be decided by the American people, and that’s why I’m urging Democrats and Republicans to pass a bill that helps to right this wrong."
Justice Clarence Thomas refuses to attend the State of the Union. Judge Samuel has stayed away at times. Perhaps they won't be so foolish to do so in the future. Perhaps they will stay home and watch the address from the comfort of their own living room. After all, they are not compelled to present themselves to the President at this event. Here is a snippet of Justice Thomas' comment after Obama's very public SOTU assault:
"I don't go because it has become so partisan," he said, "and it's very uncomfortable for a judge to sit there. There's a lot that you don't hear on TV: The catcalls, the whooping and hollering and under-the-breath comments. One of the consequences is now the court becomes part of the conversation, if you want to call it that, in the speeches. It's just an example of why I don't go."
This administration has no respect for Rule of Law. Obama didn't even respect his own grandmother. His egomaniacal-self, along with his Brat Pack advisers, trip over themselves to show deference to select foreign dignitaries, some Democrats, ACORN and all Unions, but believes our Constitution is a toy to be tinkered with...simply because he wants to. I hope the Justices stay home next time.

Chief Justice Roberts on Obama Admonishment of Supreme Court (video)

President Obama and Justice Samuel Alito at State of the Union (video)

Thanks to The Lonely Conservative for the video

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